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4 Ways to Pray for Baton Rouge

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Last Sunday, we awoke to yet another tragedy. Three law enforcement officers were killed and three more injured in Baton Rouge, mere weeks after the death of Alton Sterling.

As I saw the horrific news develop, I wanted to know how I could pray for this city reeling in pain and division. So I reached out to Katie Harris, a friend who serves in Baton Rouge with AmeriCorps. Since she lives and ministers within the city, I knew she’d be able to help me know how to pray.

She offered four ways I can pray for the city. I hope that these help you pray as well.

  1. Pray for unity, kindness and peace across all peoples, no matter the race. Baton Rouge is known for decades of racial inequalities which fuel the protests and violence that is tearing the city apart.
  1. Pray that the pain of the recent events would not lead to more violence. Pray that people will understand that hate cannot be conquered by hate.
  1. Pray that people would acknowledge injustice and peacefully and lovingly seek for all races to feel safe and accepted. Pray that they will talk to their legislators and officials in order that our brothers and sisters can live in a nation where they feel safe.
  1. Lastly and simply, pray that the families and loved ones of those who were killed or injured would be comforted by the Lord. Pray that they would feel his presence deeply and strongly. Finally, pray that they would seek help in coping with the new identity of their families.

Let’s join together in praying for Baton Rouge, the city’s law enforcement officers and the African-American community as we plead for healing and unity. How else would you suggest we pray for Baton Rouge?

Image Credit: getmahesh, Wikimedia Commons

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Nathaniel Williams

Editor and Content Manager for the CFC

Nathaniel Williams (M.Div, Southeastern Seminary) oversees the website, podcast and social media for the L. Russ Bush Center for Faith and Culture, and he serves as the pastor of Cedar Rock First Baptist Church. His work has appeared at Christianity Today, The Gospel Coalition, Fathom Mag, the ERLC and BRNow.org. He and his family live in rural North Carolina.

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