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Editor’s Choice: My 10 Favorite Articles of 2017

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So far in our 2017 recap, we published a list of your favorite articles and a list of the most-read articles. Now, I’m going to share with you a few of my favorites.

Narrowing down the list was insanely difficult. I’ve learned so much from every single article, video, interview and review Intersect published this year.

To make my task easier, I narrowed down my favorites with three criteria. First, I avoided articles already featured on the favorite and most-read lists (with one notable exception). Second, I only selected one article per author. Third, I chose articles covering a wide variety of topics.

So, without further ado, here are 10 of my favorite Intersect articles of 2017 (in no particular order).


A biblical response to gender fluidity (image credit: Michał Parzuchowski / Unsplash)

Boy, Girl or Other: Do You Get to Choose?

Science teacher Topher Thomas begins this piece with one of the most gripping introductions that came across my desk this year. But he doesn’t stop there. He continues with a biblical and biological explanation of gender, and he explores why and how God made us the way we are. It’s one of my favorite pieces of the year, and I think you’ll enjoy it too.


Law and Gospel and Gun Control. (credit: Christopher Burns / Unsplash)

Law and Gospel and Gun Control

Doug Ponder has a God-given gift for writing about diverse topics. This year, he exposed our pet idolatry, explained why he doesn’t celebrate lent, charged us to “make Thanksgiving great again” and delivered a whole series on faith and food. Each piece was wonderful.

But this piece was not only one of Doug’s best; it was one of the best we published on Intersect all year. In it, Doug carefully examines the controversial topic of gun control from a biblical perspective. And here’s the highest praise I can offer: I still have no idea where he stands on the issue. Do yourself a favor and read it.


The Burdens and Blessings of a Working Mom

Motherhood is not an easy vocation. In addition to the ups and downs of parenting children, each mother must make the dreaded decision about work. Should she stay at home? Should she go to work? This decision is rarely easy, and mothers will always face critics no matter what decision they make.

That’s why I so appreciate Krystal Wilson‘s article on being a working mother. She takes us inside her daily routine, so we can all understand what it’s like to be a working mother.


5 Ways to Help the Poor without Hurting Them

5 Ways to Help the Poor Without Hurting Them

Most of us have good intentions of helping the poor. “But good intentions aren’t enough,” explains Christy Britton.

I appreciate this article for two key reasons. First, Christy approaches this topic with humility, explaining how she too has unintentionally hurt the poor. Second, she approaches this topic from a posture of experience, having served with 127 Worldwide. Give it a read, and learn how to serve the poor better.


The Inauguration, Paula White, and the Pitfalls of the Prosperity Gospel

What’s so bad about the prosperity gospel? Dr. David W. Jones has co-written an entire book on the subject, so he is one the best at answering this question. And in this timely article, he succintly dismantles the false teaching. “The prosperity gospel is not just a different teaching,” he explains. “It is a different gospel.”


The Joys and Hardships of Adoption (image credit: Jenna Norman / Unsplash.com)

3 Joys and 3 Difficulties of Adoption

Some articles about adoption tell you about all of adoption’s joys. Others tell you about adoption’s trials. What I appreciate most about this article from Brittany Salmon is that she honestly, lovingly tells you about both — the joys and the difficulties. 

This article provides a wonderful window into what it’s like to be an adoptive parent. It’s one of my favorites of the year.


overcoming perfectionism (credit: lightstock.com)

The Recovering Perfectionist

I have a confession to make: I’m a perfectionist. We perfectionists typically see the benefits to our condition, but perfectionism isn’t harmless. It may in fact be an idol. This is what Alysha Clark so helpfully explains in this article. She spurs us recovering perfectionists to pursue excellence not for our own glory, but for God’s. If you’re a perfectionist like me, you need to give it a read.


credit: lightstock.com

Seminary Student, Don’t Waste the Job You Have Right Now

During seminary, I worked as a janitor in a large church. While exciting ministry swirled all around, I was cleaning toilets. At times, it was hard to see how my work mattered to God.

In retrospect, I wish I’d read this article by Dr. Benjamin Quinn. In it, he challenges seminary students to see that their jobs now are vitally important. At minimum, this work trains you for future ministry. But this work is valuable in and of itself — because it provides you with a path to fulfill the Great Commandment.


4 Ways to Walk with Those Who Weep (Image Credit: Ben White / Unsplash)

4 Ways to Walk With Those Who Weep

Throughout the year, Laura Thigpen wrote a series of articles on grief. All of them were valuable, but this one was my favorite. In it, Laura offers us specific, tangible ways we can walk alongside those who are suffering. This post was particularly helpful to me as a pastor, and it will be helpful to you. Listen, learn and love those who grieve.


The Cure for a Hopeless Christmas (image credit: Paola Chaaya / Unsplash)

The Cure for a Hopeless Christmas

I’ve come to realize that Christmas isn’t a joyful season for everyone. Suffering people often don’t feel like having a “Holly, Jolly Christmas.” That’s why I so appreciate this article from Dayton Hartman. He reminds us why we can have a hopeful Christmas. It isn’t because of the festive cheer or setimentality; it’s because Jesus’ first coming points us to the fact he will one day come again. Read this piece and be encouraged this Christmas.


It’s hard for me to stop here. I could go on about Michael Guyer’s “Don’t Waste Your College,” or Amanda Aucoin’s “5 Christian Women Who Have Shaped Culture,” or Lemanuel Williams’ “The White Supremacy Within Us.” I could cite any number of the superb interviews we’ve published, or the insightful videos, or helpful book reviews. But, for the sake of brevity, I’ll stop at 10.

Which article was your favorite, and why? Tell us about it in the comments.

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  • economics
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  • transgender
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Nathaniel Williams

Editor and Content Manager for the CFC

Nathaniel Williams (M.Div, Southeastern Seminary) oversees the website, podcast and social media for the L. Russ Bush Center for Faith and Culture, and he serves as the pastor of Cedar Rock First Baptist Church. His work has appeared at Christianity Today, The Gospel Coalition, Fathom Mag, the ERLC and BRNow.org. He and his family live in rural North Carolina.

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